Review of The Innkeeper Chronicles Volume One by Ilona Andrews

The Innkeeper Chronicles: Volume One by Ilona Andrews. ★★★1/2 I’ve long been a fan of Ilona Andrew’s Kate Daniel books, but The Innkeeper Chronicles was the first time I’ve checked out some of their other work. This edition is the first three books in the series bound into one volume. For plot specific commentary, I will divide this review…

Review of This Other World by A.C. Buchanan

This Other World by A.C. Buchanan. ★★★★ What a lovely science fiction novella! It’s a quiet story, and a short read (I read it in under an hour). Because of that, this review will be a bit shorter than normal. Vonika’s an autistic engineer who chose to immigrate to an alien planet. She has built a career…

Review of Rosewater by Tade Thompson

Rosewater by Tade Thompson. ★★★★ Rosewater is one of the most inventive science fiction novels I’ve read in a long time, and I dearly hope it gets more attention. Nigeria, 2066. Kaaro lives in the city of Rosewater, a settlement that grew up around an alien biodome. He spends his days providing psychic protection for a bank, but secretly,…

Review of Fortune’s Pawn by Rachel Bach

Fortune’s Pawn by Rachel Bach. ★★★1/2 I was in the mood for something fast paced with a lot of action and preferably explosions. Fortune’s Pawn was a perfect fit. It’s sort of like Guardians of the Galaxy crossed with Ilona Andrew’s Kate Daniels series. Basically, a lot of fun. Devi Morris wants nothing more than to join the elite unit of…

Review of Midnight Robber by Nalo Hopkinson

Midnight Robber by Nalo Hopkinson. ★★★ Trigger warning: Rape Tan-Tan is a young girl living on the Caribbean planet of Toussaint. But the world she lives in is only one dimension of the planet. What happens when she and her father fall into the wilderness of New-Half Way Tree, the alternate dimension where Toussaint sends criminals and exiles?

Review of And All the Stars by Andrea K. Host

And All the Stars by Andrea K. Höst. ★★★1/2 And All the Stars is one of the better YA apocalyptic novels I’ve read. Towers have sprouted from cities around the world, spreading a strange dust. Those who encounter the dust either die or transform… Madeleine Cost is a fifteen year old artist who’s skipping school to go paint a…

Review of The Color of Distance by Amy Thomson

The Color of Distance by Amy Thomson. ★★★★ The Color of Distance was one of the most compelling first contact stories I’ve come across. At first I was a bit skeptical, sure I would be getting a story that I’d seen a million times before. However, The Color of Distance won me over with it’s focus on characterization and underlying…

Review of The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers. ★★★★ The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet is a delightful stand alone science fiction novel. Reading it was like wrapping myself in a warm, fluffy blanket on a cold day. Focusing on the nine member crew of the Wayfarer, this episodic book is character based story…

Review of Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor

Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor. ★★★★ A mysterious object crashes off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest city. Three people – Adaora, a marine biologist; Anthony, a hip hop artist; and Agu, the solider – are inexplicably drawn to Bar Beach, where they are the first people to encounter the aliens. Lagoon interweaves many different threads, but ultimately it is a…

Review of Buried Deep by Kristine Kathryne Rusch

Buried Deep by Kristine Kathryn Rusch. ★★★★ Buried Deep is the fourth book in Rusch’s science fiction mystery series, the Retrieval Artist novels. The first is The Disappeared, but you could likely read Buried Deep as a stand alone if you wished. Each novel contains a separate mystery, although all are set in the same world and involve two of the…

Review of Quicksilver by R. J. Anderson

Quicksilver by R. J. Anderson. ★★★★1/2 First thing you should know: Quicksilver is a sequel. It has a different protagonist and shows many of the relevant events from the first novel through flashback, but you’ll still have a better grasp on what’s going on if you read the first book. Since that’s out of the way, I really loved Quicksilver….

Review of Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks

Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks. ★★★ Consider Phlebas was just not the right book for me. While I thought it was well written and appreciated some of the ideas, the end result left me cold. Consider Phlebas is a long space opera set against the background of an epic war between two civilizations, one based around artificial…