Ten Female Led SFF Novels without Romance

February’s the time of year where people get even more obsessed about romantic love than usual. But even in the rest of the year, there’s often a sense that romance is mandatory. The vast majority of books I read contain a romantic subplot for their lead, particularly if the protagonist happens to be female. With this post, I want to take a step back and look at some of the few science fiction and fantasy books I’ve found where romance isn’t on the heroine’s mind. Note, I am not up to date with all of these series, and some of them may add on romance later in.

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Review of Chameleon Moon by RoAnna Sylver

31938167Chameleon Moon by RoAnna Sylver. ★★★★

I loved Chameleon Moon so much, and I think it would hold a strong appeal for fans of Welcome to Night Vale.

Patrol is a true dystopian – a city where the sky is chocked with smoke and ash and the ground is just one step away from crumbling into the fires below. And above everything the helicopters of Eye in the Sky survey the super powered citizens, making sure no one can escape. But within this hellhole, the citizens of Patrol have found love, families, and the will to resist. Among them is Evelyn Calliope, a singer with a sonic voice who is the heroine that Patrol needs.

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Review of Love Beyond Body, Space & Time: An Indigenous LGBT Sci-Fi Anthology

31560094Love Beyond Body, Space and Time: An Indigenous LGBT Sci-Fi Anthology edited by Hope Nicholson. ★★★

If you can’t tell from the title, Love Beyond Body, Space and Time is a short story collection focused on LGBT and two-spirit science fiction and fantasy and written by all indigenous authors. I always have an eye out for queer SFF, and I also haven’t read much by Native American authors. I want to correct this flaw in my reading, and this anthology looked like it would introduce me to a number of relevant authors.

The only author in the anthology I’d heard of before was Daniel Heath Justice, although this was my first chance to read his work. As I’d hoped, I enjoyed several short stories in this collection and will seek out more of those author’s work.

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Review of Iron Cast by Destiny Soria

28818313Iron Cast by Destiny Soria. ★★★★1/2

I loved this book a lot more than I ever could have predicted. If you have any interest at all in a YA historical fantasy with a focus on female friendship, you should read this book.

Ada Navarra and Corinne Wells are best of friends who preform together at the Cast Iron nightclub in Boston, the year of 1919. But their performance is no usual routine, for Ada and Corinne are hemopaths – people who’s afflicted blood gives them magical abilities based on the arts. Ada can affect people’s emotions with her music and Corinne can use her poetry recital to craft illusions. But it’s not easy to be a hemopath in Boston of 1919. Performances have been outlawed and while the club still performs illegally, Ada and Corinne have been running cons to make ends meet. At the beginning of Iron Cast, Ada has been captured and imprisoned in one of the institutions designed to be the “humane” solution for the hemopath “problem.” But that’s only the start of the pair’s trouble.

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Review of Of Sorrow and Such by Angela Slatter

25664279Of Sorrow and Such by Angela Slatter. ★★★★

I didn’t know what to expect when I picked up this novella by a new to me author, Angela Slatter. What I got was a beautiful if dark tale with a feminist heart. I most certainly need to read more by Angela Slatter.

Mistress Gideon is a witch, and her life in Edda’s Meadow is tenuous at best in a world where witches are regularly killed. When a local and foolish shapeshifter gets herself caught, Gideon finds herself unwittingly involved. And as the authorities are roused to the existence of the supernatural in Edda’s Meadow, Gideon’s life gets more and more dangerous.

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